A few Photos

I have been learning so much from our monthly culture nights. Each month the students present about their local cultures from their various islands. This photo was from “Sumba” night.
I’m loving living with the girls in our program! This is a photo from last month of a few of the now 40 girls that live in our dormitory.
During one of the recruiting trips, I had the joy of meeting the parents and families of some of our existing students.

As I type this I have just returned from a trip to recruit new students for our teacher training program and I’m about to get on an airplane to go out to some villages and recruit more. I thank each of you deeply for how you have supported me thus far and the incredible things God is doing in growing education throughout Indonesia. God has continued to open my eyes more and more to the dire need for education throughout this country. This education doesn’t just give knowledge but it’s empowering entire villages and transforming the lives of families with the Good News to those who have never heard it. Please continue to pray for us as we look for and train high impact teachers who will ultimately bring life changing education to children throughout Indonesia who so desperately need it.

Wisdom to Know the Difference

God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change
the courage to change the things I can
And the wisdom to know the difference.

I stared at this prayer each day before I tucked into bed, pondering its deep meaning. For my 13th birthday my mom cross-stitched the prayer and hung it beautifully there for me to look at and contemplate. But what did it really mean?

For years it was always the third part of the prayer which captured my attention the most. Wisdom to know the difference. The words reverberated through my mind during my moments of failure, both small and large. A scoreless basketball game. Being rejected for a job. Financial stress. Being told by my university that they wouldn’t support me moving overseas. Wisdom to know that these are things which I must accept and which I cannot change.

A few weeks ago I found myself in the back of a pickup truck barreling through dirt roads on the island of Flores. We were on our way to visit a school, but as we got further and further from civilization I found myself struggling to accept the fact that small children would walk such distances in the rain and mud just to receive an education. As our truck tumbled up to the school, children poured out of the classrooms. Their smiling faces and joy-filled eyes distracted from the dirt caked between their toes and their mud-stained clothes. Good morning Mister! Good morning Mister! Gleeful laughter erupted from their little cliques. As I peered into their faces I allowed myself to take a moment and dream about their futures. These kids had already sacrificed so much just to get an elementary school education. Would they survive through middle school and high school? Become leaders? Become doctors, engineers, businessmen, on teachers? My heart broke as I realized the reality that for many of these kids dreams for the futures couldn’t happen because the education they needed just didn’t exist.

Wisdom to know the difference. The words rang in my head again. But this time I saw these words in a different light. Wisdom to know that I CAN DO SOMETHING. The serenity prayer immediately took on a whole new meaning to me. Instead of focusing on all of the ways I was powerless, on all of the things I needed to let go of, my eyes were suddenly opened to all the responsibility I have as a child of God. The courage to change the things I can. Bringing education for the poor. Loving the unloved. Feeding the hungry. There is just so much we can do to serve God’s children. But do we have the courage?

With this renewed ambition and excitement we have been growing out teacher training program over the last few months with the goal of getting more Christian teachers into more schools in more villages in order to influence and share the Good News with more kids.

Sharing is Proof that we Care

Have you ever heard that whisper in your ear to just let go, and give to God that thing which you are holding on to so closely? To jump into His loving arms and trust him to carry you the way? Living a life of faith demands us to walk to the edge of our comfort zone and patiently trust God as we surrender that which we feel we are entitled to.

Recently one of my students shared with me a story of when he was in elementary school in a tiny village on the remote island of Papua. Read below to learn about a moment he had to give up what he held closely to him to God, and how God provided for him.

When I was in elementary school, my friends and I would walk 2-3 hours to school each day. We were lucky if it didn’t rain. We hiked up through the mountains and crossed rivers. But it was worth it, because we desperately wanted to get an education.

One morning, when we arrived at the school, we found out that the government had given a sponsorship for my friends and I to receive some simple school supplies and a school uniform. They gave us these things with the instructions that anyone who lost their uniform or school supplies would receive a spanking on Monday. I received one school uniform, and one pencil. With excitement, I left for home. All of a sudden on my walk home it started to pour down rain and my brand new uniform and pencil got soaking wet. All of my new supplies were ruined. What could I do? The whole way home I cried. To walk home in the rain was a regular occurrence for me, but to lose my brand new uniform and pencil was a tragedy.

On Monday I went to school with my friends. Before we went into the school the teacher checked all of the new supplies that had been given to us the week before. Myself and a few of my friends were given a spanking and sent home, and were told that the we had to come back to school with our new supplies. After going home I didn’t know what to do, so I just prayed to God and also asked my friends for help. I thank God, because there was one friend who reached out to me. I told him the story of my supplies being drenched in the rain on my way home and how they had been destroyed. My friend had an idea. He took his pencil and he broke it in two, and gave me half. Since he had two books, he gave me one. I was overwhelmed. I hugged him. I received it with such gratitude and was so thankful to have a friend who loved me like that. Sharing is proof that we care for each other.